Research and Innovation

Beth Stormshak
February 4

UO lands four scholars for obesity prevention cluster

The new faculty members will be part of the Health Promotion and Obesity Prevention Initiative, one of the UO’s clusters of excellence.
Robert Schofield
January 28

Skilled workers: Study shows the talents of leafcutter ants

Research in Colombia, Ecuador and Robert Schofield's UO lab shows how these ants use their legs and divide their leaf-processing duties.
The Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory Climate Chamber
January 25

Science Friday chases bugs with look at UO research

The popular NPR program will feature research from the UO on microbial clouds and antibiotic-resistent pathogens found in dust.
Richard Taylor
January 19

UO idea for bio-inspired implant wins $900,000 grant

The award from the W.M. Keck Foundation will support an interdisciplinary research team led by physicist Richard Taylor.
Photo of two UO grad students prepping a seismometer for deployment
January 11

UO-led expedition probes undersea magma system

Emilie Hooft and Doug Toomey charted the course of a month-long journey to provide the clearest detail yet of volcanic plumbing deep under the seafloor.
Ken Prehoda in his lab
January 7

A mutation, a protein combo, and life went multicellular

UO-led group proposes that an evolutionary change of protein interactions in cells some 600 million years ago changed life on Earth.
Bill Cresko looks over his collection of threespine stickleback used in his research
December 14

UO-led study shows fish evolved rapidly after 1964 Alaska quake

Genome-sequencing technology developed at the UO was key in documenting rapid evolutionary adaptation to environmental change in less than 50 years.
December 4

UO researchers show how fruit fly stem cells are kept in check during brain development

The precise timing of molecular changes, including a protein with a human version, shuts down a path that leads to tumor formation.
Jill Marshall watches as workers operate drilling equipment
November 27

Sediment buried in Oregon Coast Range points to a frosty past

Landscapes across much of North America were colder and eroded rapidly from cracking frost during the last ice age, according to UO research.
November 19

New finds in Chile could 'shake up' archaeology, says UO's Erlandson

UO professor gives his reaction to new artifacts found at Monte Verde that push the clock back 4,000 years for human presence in the Americas.

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