Feminist philosophy journal Hypatia finds a new home at UO

Bust of Hypatia

The UO philosophy department is already known as a leading program in feminist philosophy, and it just got another boost: The highest-ranking journal in the field has relocated to Eugene.

“Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy,” is now based out of the University of Oregon’s philosophy department, where it will be co-edited by four UO faculty members and receive additional support from the Center for the Study of Women in Society. Under the group’s leadership, the publication will be an interdisciplinary and intersectional forum for cutting-edge work in feminist philosophy, as well as a vital classroom resource.   

“This journal has been instrumental in driving the conversation around feminist philosophy and legitimizing the field,” said co-editor Bonnie Mann. “We are thrilled to welcome the publication to the University of Oregon, where we can play a role in shaping the field of feminist philosophy on a national and international level.”

Hypatia editorial board

Joining Mann on the editorial team are Erin McKenna, Camisha Russell and Rocío Zambrana. The group decided to double the number of editorial staff in an effort to foster greater diversity and increase the depth of perspectives and experience. They hope the approach positions them to be responsive to many different areas of feminist philosophy and promote diversity within feminist thinking.

Feminist philosophy is a segment of the discipline that considers philosophical questions through the lens of gender and sexuality. The field is a central pillar of the philosophy program at the UO. Many faculty members and students specialize in research that considers feminist philosophy, and graduate students are required to fulfill core requirements in the area, which is not standard across graduate programs.

Women faculty members also outnumber their male colleagues in the philosophy department at the UO, which is unusual in academia, as the field is known for being heavily dominated by men. The new editors say the addition of Hypatia to the philosophy department at the UO will build on that established foundation and enrich the university’s academic reputation and international visibility.  

The group believes this is a pivotal time for feminist philosophy, and they’re excited about the opportunity to provide a venue for robust discussion and scholarship as the field seeks to solidify and grow its foothold within philosophy.

“In this particular time, when feminist gains are particularly fragile, we believe in the significance of Hypatia to both emerging and established feminist and marginalized voices in philosophy,” the editors wrote in an introductory statement. “In the context of this fragility, we have an opportunity to build on the strengths of the journal, as well as recognizing its shortcomings and aspiring to its promise.”

Some of their initial ideas for the publication include special issues, guest editors and publishing clusters of papers that consider overlapping concepts. They also invite the campus community to reach out with hopes and concerns.

By Emily Halnon, University Communications