OQ Bookmarks

MEN IN PLACE: TRANS MASCULINITY, RACE, AND SEXUALITY IN AMERICA
By Miriam Abelson, MS ’10 (Sociology)

Through in-depth interviews with trans men in cities and rural areas across the US, Abelson explores the shifting meanings of being a man. She shows how the places and spaces men inhabit are fundamental to their experiences of race, sexuality, and gender. (April 2019)

KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON FOR IKE
By Rebecca Daniels, PhD ’92 (Speech: Theatre Arts)

Daniels’ memoir explores the day-to-day realities of an individual noncombat support soldier. Told in the soldier’s own words—as much as he could share under the wartime rules of censorship—and through his personal correspondence, the memoir gives insight into Allied Force Headquarters in Europe during WWII. (April 2019)

AUGMENTED MIND: AI, HUMANS AND THE SUPERHUMAN REVOLUTION
By Alex Bates, BS ’00 (Computer and Information Science)

In this culmination of his research on how humans and artificial intelligence interact, Bates explains how AI and intelligence augmentation have revolutionary potential. He outlines a framework for combining AI, machine learning, and human intuition to predict the future, improve our social lives, and eliminate scarcity. (April 2019)

ALL OF THE ROGERS
By Erin Lockwood, BA ’03 (Journalism: Electronic Media Production)

Kerri is a high school senior who, after a rigorous childhood of ballet training, is looking for a little adventure and normal teenage drama, which is how she meets Roger. In taking us through their relationship, Lockwood portrays the real-life struggles that teenagers deal with every day, and the complicated nature of human connections. (April 2019)

SAGEBRUSH COLLABORATION
By Peter Walker, Professor of Geography and Environmental Studies

Walker contributes to the ongoing battle over the future of America’s public lands and offers the first book-length study arguing why the 2016 takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge failed. His nuanced and deeply researched account provides the full context for the takeover, including the response from local and federal officials and the grassroots community resistance. (April 2019)

WOODSWORK: NEW AND SELECTED STORIES OF THE AMERICAN WEST
By Miles Wilson, MFA ’68 (Creative Writing)

With stories ranging from realism to fables, from childhood to senescence, from a faltering rancher to the rich and rocky road of fatherhood, Wilson pulls together a myriad of tales from four decades that are grounded in the geographical, cultural, and psychological American West. Woodswork was a finalist for the Texas Institute of Letters Jesse Jones Award for Best Work of Fiction. (April 2019)

 

STOKING THE FIRE: NATIONHOOD IN CHEROKEE WRITING, 1907-1970
By Kirby Brown, Associate Professor of Native American Literatures

Brown brings to light a rich array of writing that counters the view that the years between Oklahoma’s statehood in 1907 and the reemergence of the Cherokee Nation in 1971 were the intellectual, political, and literary “dark age” in Cherokee history. He reveals how their writings reimagined, enacted, and bore witness to Cherokee nationhood in the absence of a functioning Cherokee state. (April 2019)

THE SIXTH STORM
By Kim Cooper Findling, BA ’93 (Psychology), and Libby Findling

In their first teen mystery novel, mother-daughter duo Kim and Libby craft a story about 14-year-old Skye and her quest to determine why the weather torments her family above all others. Skye embarks into the wild woods of Oregon to solve the mystery and reverse the curse that has left a family legacy of death and destruction in its wake. (April 2019)

BIOGRAPHIES OF WESTERN PHOTOGRAPHERS—EXPANDED AND REVISED
By Carl Mautz, BS ’65 (History)

This monumental work covers 20,000-plus photographers working in the US and Canadian provinces from 1840-1900. There is an alphabetical index by state, province, or category of all photographers listed; a comprehensive bibliography; an essay on collecting imprints; and identifying and categorizing information on photographs. (April 2019)

 

MINDFUL RELATIONSHIPS: SEVEN SKILLS FOR SUCCESS
By B. Grace Bullock, PhD ’02 (Clinical Psychology)

Bullock integrates the science of mind, body, and brain to reveal how stress undermines our relationships with others, and what we can do about it. With her BREATHE model, she lays out steps to manage stress and lead a more fulfilling, peaceful life. (April 2019)

BARNBURNER
By Erin Hoover, MFA ’05 (Creative Writing and Poetry)

Hoover’s first book, winner of the 2017 Elixir Press Antivenom Poetry Award, is a collection of poems that tackles issues of class, sexual politics, and the environment. With narrative and irony driving her writing, she strips bare the cruelties of a homogeneous, racist patriarchy and confronts the absurd in conventional white feminine sexual identity. (April 2019)

NATURALLY ANIMATED ARCHITECTURE
By Kevin Nute, Professor of Architecture

Winner of the 2018 Digital Book World Architecture Book Award, this video-augmented book explains how the natural movements of the elements can be used to improve the well-being of people in buildings. Nute shows how, in the process of separating us from the extremes of the natural world, architecture can also reconnect us with nature. (April 2019)

 

TOUGH GIRL: AN OLYMPIAN'S JOURNEY
By Carolyn Wood, BA ’67 (English)

Wood tells the stories of two profound journeys: one to the 1960 Rome Olympics, where she competed on the US women’s swimming team, and 52 years later, along the Camino de Santiago. In her compelling memoir, Wood tells stories of friendship, love, loss, and grief. (March 2019)

DON'T SKIP OUT ON ME
By Willy Vlautin, BS ’90 (History)

In writing the story of Horace Hopper, a half-Paiute, half-Irish man searching for belonging and trying to make a name for himself in the Southwest, Vlautin narrates the struggle of finding one’s place in a vast and lonely world. His novel was nominated for a PEN/Faulkner award. (March 2019)

LAWRENCE HALPRIN
By Kenneth Helphand, Knight Professor of Landscape Architecture

Helphand gives a definitive overview of Halprin, the renowned American landscape architect. In his lifelong effort to improve the American landscape, Halprin celebrated the creative process as a form of social activism. (March 2019)

 

DEFIANT INDIGENEITY: THE POLITICS OF HAWAIIAN PERFORMANCE
By Stephanie Nohelani Teves, Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 

Teves explores the way the word “aloha” is embodied, performed, and interpreted as part of Hawaiian performance, going beyond the tourist experience to theorize how Hawaiians use aloha as a means of creating and empowering community. (March 2019)

DREAMING IN TURTLE: A JOURNEY THROUGH THE PASSION, PROFIT, AND PERIL OF OUR MOST COVETED PREHISTORIC CREATURES
By Peter Laufer, Professor of Journalism and James N. Wallace Chair of Journalism: News Editorial

Laufer offers a tale not just of endangered turtles but of human failings, frailties, and vulnerabilities―all punctuated by hope for change fueled by dedicated champions of turtles. (March 2019)

OREGON WILDLAND FIREFIGHTING: A HISTORY
By Sean Davis, BS ’09 (Political Science)

Some of the world’s largest wildland fires have occurred in Oregon, ranging from the Great Fire of 1845 to the Long Draw Fire of 2012. Veteran wildland firefighter Davis shares harrowing frontline accounts of forest fire battles. (March 2019)

BEING QUAKER. . .WHERE YOU ARE: A JOURNEY AMONG ISOLATED FRIENDS IN THE NORTHWEST
By Sakre Kennington Edson, PhD ’80 (Educational Administration)

In this compilation of interviews with nearly 60 Quaker men and women in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana, Edson explores the ways people who live in remote areas practice Quakerism and maintain their faith. She includes a companion glossary of Quaker terms and her own impressions while traveling throughout the Northwest for the interviews. (December 2018)

PRIVACY, SURVEILLANCE, AND THE NEW MEDIA YOU
By Edward Lee Lamoureux, PhD ’85 (Speech: Rhetoric and Communication)

Examining challenges in a wide range of contexts, Lamoureux studies our systems of data management, including the ways that data are collected, exchanged, analyzed, and repurposed. He calls for the reestablishment of personal privacy as a societal norm and priority, which will require broad action across personal, societal, business, and governmental levels. (December 2018)

CIRCUMSION AND COFFEE IN UGANDA: BAMASAABA RESPONSES TO INCURSION, COLONIALISM, AND NATIONALISM 1840-1962
By James Lassiter, MS ’75, PhD ’83 (Anthropology)

In this ethnography about the Bamasaaba from ancient times to Ugandan independence in 1962, Lassiter describes how they emerged as a distinct ethnic group and maintained their culture and identity despite—and in response to—European colonial invasions and incursions by slave traders and Anglican and Catholic churches, among others. (December 2018)

STANLEY JOHNSTON’S BLUNDER: THE REPORTER WHO SPILLED THE SECRET BEHIND THE US NAVY’S VICTORY AT MIDWAY
By Elliot Carlson, BS ’60 (Political Science)

Using FBI files, US Navy records, archival materials from the Chicago Tribune, and Japanese sources, Carlson reveals the story of Stanley Johnston, a Chicago Tribune reporter who leaked a vitally important naval secret during World War II—and the trial against him. (December 2018)

FROM OLIGARCHY TO REPUBLICANISM: THE GREAT TASK OF RECONSTRUCTION
By Forrest Nabors, MS ’08, PhD ’11 (Political Science)

Nabors argues congressional Republicans regarded the work of Reconstruction in the same way they regarded the work of the Founders: as regime change, from monarchy in the one case and from oligarchy in the other, to republicanism. He identifies that Southern oligarchy, not the typically emphasized concern of Black citizenship, was seen as the central problem to congressional Republicans. (December 2018)

THE BROADCAST 41: WOMEN AND THE ANTICOMMUNIST BLACKLIST
By Carol Stabile, Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives for the College of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 

Stabile tells the story of how, during the 1950s “Red Scare,” American television and radio eliminated dissenting viewpoints and forced out 41 women working in those mediums, including Dorothy Parker, Lena Horne, and Gypsy Rose Lee. In her investigation, Stabile examines the ways in which our cultural narrative is constructed and the consequences that arise from perpetuating only dominant perspectives on the airwaves.      (​​​November 2018)

OREGON FESTIVALS: A GUIDE TO FUN, FRIENDS, FOOD AND FRIVOLITY
By John Shewey, BS ’89 (Journalism)

Shewey’s guidebook depicts the remarkable diversity of festivals throughout Oregon and it’s a companion for fest-goers and visitors to the state. Each festival entry is detailed with concise information and tidbits from the author, and is accompanied by colorful photographs. (December 2018)

IMMORTAL'S SPRING
By Molly Ringle, BA ’96 (Anthropology)

The third and final book in Ringle’s Chrysomelia series reimagines the myth of Persephone and Hades by introducing modern-day reincarnations of gods and goddesses. It’s the epic conclusion to the story of Sophie Darrow and her fight against the anti-immortal Thanatos cultists who are determined to destroy her and her friends. (December 2018)

ISLE OF BLOOD AND STONE
By Makiia Lucier, BA ’97 (Public Relations)

In her second young adult novel and first in a duology, Lucier weaves a historical fantasy of intrigue and schemes, romance and friendship, and fearless explorers on a breathtaking adventure. Elias, Mercedes, and Ulises must solve the riddles hidden in a pair of old maps to discover the truth of their past and solve the infamous legend of their kingdom. (December 2018)

REIMAGINING JOURNALISM IN A POST-TRUTH WORLD: HOW LATE-NIGHT COMEDIANS, INTERNET TROLLS, AND SAVVY REPORTERS ARE TRANSFORMING NEWS 
By Ben DeJarnette, BA ’13 (Journalism), MA ’15 (Media Studies), and Ed Madison, Assistant Professor in Multimedia Journalism

In a world of “alternative facts” and “post-truth” politics, producing public-interest journalism is more important than ever―but also more complex. The authors examine how journalism is evolving to meet the demands of digital media. They assess the roots of the journalism crisis and provide context for the “fake news” phenomenon of the 2016 election, while explaining how journalists are rebuilding trust in the media. (​​​November 2018)

THE PEOPLE'S SCHOOL: A HISTORY OF OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
By William Robbins, MA ’65 (History), PhD ’69 (History)

Robbins chronicles the comprehensive history of Oregon State University, using administration records, student publications, and state and local newspapers, among other materials. From the disruptions caused by the wars of the 20th century to the role of Oregon tax policy on the allocation of funds, the book places the institution’s story in the broader context of state, regional, national, and international events. (October 2018)

ERNEST HAYCOX AND THE WESTERN
By Richard Etulain, MA ’62 (Interdisciplinary Studies), PhD ’66 (History)

The Western Literature Association’s 2018 “Book of the Year” captures the life of Oregon writer Ernest Haycox, BS ’23 (journalism). Revised from Etulain’s doctoral dissertation and published 50 years later, the book follows Haycox as he rose through the ranks of popular magazine and Western fiction, tracing his path from rank beginner to crack pulp writer to regular contributor to Collier’s and the Saturday Evening Post. (October 2018)

FROM BOOM TO GHOST TOWN: CORNUCOPIA, OREGON
By Thomas Taylor Cook, BS ’77 (Elementary Education), MS ’79 (Curriculum and Instruction)

The gold-mining boomtown of Cornucopia, located in Oregon’s northeast corner, was once a bustling home for miners, prostitutes, outlaws, and ghosts. In his second book on the gold-mining history in Eastern Oregon, Cook takes the reader back to Cornucopia before it became a ghost town, while also suggesting what can be done in the present to keep its history alive. (October 2018)

SUSTAINABLE HOMES FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
By Richard Benner, JD ’75, and Michael Royce 

Benner and Royce designed Ankeny Row in Portland as a model for a zero-energy, age-in-place cohousing community for retirees. The authors champion sustainability as they recount what they learned while creating this innovative, green building plan and the fun and fumbles they encountered along the way. (October 2018)

WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS
By Howard Libes,  MFA ’89 (Creative Writing)

The first book in Libes’ science fiction Seeder Series is set in a world damaged by technology and afflicted with the consequences of climate change, greed, and an authoritarian government. Packed with mystery and adventure, the novel follows the story of the Vanderlord family and their struggles to defy the global government and save the planet. (October 2018)

 

A WAY HOME: OREGON ESSAYS
By Scott F. Parker, BS ’04 (General Science and Philosophy)

Parker pens a love letter to Oregon and an ode to living in the present. After living several years in Minnesota, he longs for the Oregon of his youth; over the course of several visits and the unfolding of memory, he discovers what he is capable of understanding about time, home, and himself. (October 2018)

THE SPORTS PLAYBOOK: BUILDING TEAMS THAT OUTPERFORM YEAR AFTER YEAR

Why do some teams consistently succeed—and others fail? Authors Joshua Gordon, a UO instructor of sports business, Ken Pendleton, PhD ’98 (philosophy), practitioner at the Sports Conflict Institute, and Gary Furlong provide a playbook that helps teams fulfill their potential through leadership, focus, and performance. They analyze winning cultures, from the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs to Germany’s 1960 gold medal rowing team. (October 2018)

THE PROMISE AND PRACTICE OD NEXT GENERATION ASSESSMENT
By David T. Conley, Professor of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership

Conley calls for a new system of student assessment beyond merely ranking them. Changes in the aim of education, he argues, demand approaches that help all students succeed in college and careers. Rather than relying on high-stakes, multiple-choice tests, he endorses drawing on a diverse portfolio of personalized assessments. (October 2018)

 

MADSTONE: THE TRUE TALE OF WORLD WAR I CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS ALFRED AND CHARLIE FATTIG AND THEIR OREGON WILDERNESS HIDEOUT
By Paul Fattig,  BS ’79 (Journalism)

In 1917, two brothers drafted for WWI hid for three years in southwest Oregon’s wilderness. Fattig captures the fascinating tale of two colorful draft dodgers and also interviews veterans on the war. Like most rural areas, the region was rife with young men eager to test their mettle in war—patriotism was encouraged, pacifism was not. (October 2018)

LIVESTOCK: FOOD, FIBER, AND FRIENDS
By Erin McKenna, Professor of Philosophy

Most livestock in America currently live in cramped, unhealthy confinement and finish their lives by being transported and killed under stressful conditions. In Livestock, McKenna interweaves stories from visits to farms, interviews with producers and activists, and other rich material about the current condition of livestock. She mixes her account with pragmatist and ecofeminist theorizing and provides historical background about individual species and human-animal relations. (July 2018)

THE TRADE: MY JOURNEY INTO THE LABYRINTH OF POLITICAL KIDNAPPING 
By Jere Van Dyk, BS '68 (Political Science)

In 2014, Jere Van Dyk traveled to Afghanistan to try to discover the motives behind a kidnapping that had occurred six years earlier--his own. Van Dyk's journey revealed evidence of lucrative transactions and rival bandit groups working under the direction of intelligence services. In its course, he met the families of many Americans who were or are still kidnapped, bargaining chips at the mercy of violent and pitiless extremists who thrive in the world's most lawless spaces. (July 2018)

SEEING SPECIESRE-PRESENTATIONS OF ANIMALS IN MEDIA & POPULAR CULTURE  
By Debra Merskin, Professor of Media Studies

Seeing Species examines the use of animals in media, tracking species from appearances in rock art and picture books to contemporary portrayals in television programs and movies. This book brings together sociological, psychological, historical, cultural, and environmental ways of thinking about nonhuman animals and our relationships with them. (July 2018)

POCKET FIELD GUIDE: OREGON JELLIES 
By Kelly Sutherland, Samantha Zeman, Richard Brodeur, Clare Hansen (Oregon Sea Grant, 2018)

Have you ever seen jellyfish while walking the beach? This guide was created to help beachgoers identify some of the common jellyfish they might encounter while beachcombing or out on the ocean. With this guide, readers can appreciate the diversity of gelatinous animals on the Oregon coast and gain some insight into their natural history. (July 2018)

ROADSIDE GEOLOGY OF OREGON
By Marli Miller, Senior Instructor of Earth Sciences

When the first edition of Roadside Geology of Oregon was published in 1978, the implications of plate tectonic theory were only beginning to shape geologic research and discussion. Miller has written a second edition based on an up-to-date understanding of Oregon’s geology. Photographs showcase the state’s splendor while helping readers understand geologic processes at work. (April 2018)

IN THE SHADOW OF WORLD LITERATURE: SITES OF READING IN COLONIAL EGYPT
By Michael Allan, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature

Allan, winner of the Modern Languages Association Prize for a First Book, makes a momentous intervention into discussions about the global status of literary culture by way of modern Arabic writing, and poses big questions about the nature and operation of literature. He asks how certain forms of writing come to be designated as world literature. (April 2018)

NOW I CAN SEE THE MOON: A STORY OF A SOCIAL PANIC, FALSE MEMORIES, AND A LIFE CUT SHORT
By Alice Tallmadge, MA ’87 (Journalism)

In the 1980s and ’90s, a social panic over child sex abuse swept through the country, landing innocent childcare workers in prison and leading hundreds of women to begin recalling episodes of satanic ritual abuse and childhood abuse by family members. In trying to understand the suicide of her 23-year-old niece, a victim of the panic, Tallmadge discovers that what she thought was an isolated tragedy was, in fact, part of a much larger social phenomenon. (April 2018)

RED DIAPER DAUGHTER: THREE GENERATIONS OF REBELS AND REVOLUTIONARIES
By Laura Bock, BA ’67 (English)

Bock grew up in the late 1940s and ’50s, the daughter of socialists in the labor movement and the granddaughter of Russian-Jewish social revolutionaries. She tells stories of her family legacy, the impact of McCarthyism on her childhood, coming of age in the civil rights and antiwar movements of the 1960s, and finding her voice in the second wave of the women’s liberation movement of the mid-1970s. (April 2018)

HOMETOWN RELIGION: REGIMES OF COEXISTENCE IN EARLY MODERN WESTPHALIA
By David M. Luebke, Professor of History

The pluralization of Christianity dominated cultural life in 16th-century Europe, but in the prince-bishopric of Münster no one form of Christianity prevailed. Hometown Religion was named 2017’s “best book published in English in the field of German Reformation history,” and received an honorable mention for another prize, from the main organization for Reformation-era scholars. (January 2018)

TURNED INSIDE OUT: READING THE RUSSIAN NOVEL IN PRISON
By Steven Shankman, Professor of English

Shankman goes behind prison walls to teach students and inmates texts by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Vasily Grossman, and Emmanuel Levinas. These persecuted writers—Shankman argues that Dostoevsky’s and Levinas’ experiences of incarceration were formative—describe ethical obligation as an experience of being turned inside out by the face-to-face encounter. (January 2018)

CROWN JEWEL WILDERNESS: CREATING NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK
By Lauren Danner, PhD ’99 (Communication and Society)

In the first comprehensive account of the creation of North Cascades National Park, Danner weaves a narrative that involves more than a decade of grassroots activism and political maneuvering. An unprecedented turn of events left the National Park Service and US Forest Service, agencies that often had adversarial viewpoints and objectives, working side by side. (January 2018)

TRUMP IN THE WHITE HOUSE: TRAGEDY AND FARCE
By John Bellamy Foster, Professor of Sociology

Foster does what no other Trump analyst has done before: he places the president and his administration in full historical context. Foster reveals that Trump is merely the endpoint of a stagnating economic system whose liberal democratic sheen has begun to wear thin. Change can’t happen without radical, antifascist politics, and inside Foster’s analysis is a call to fight back, demonstrating it may be possible to end endless war and create global solidarity with oppressed people. (January 2018)