OQ Bookmarks

Books on a shelf

Summer 2018

The Trade

 

THE TRADE: MY JOURNEY INTO THE LABYRINTH OF POLITICAL KIDNAPPING
By Jere Van Dyk, BS '68 (Political Science)

In 2014, Jere Van Dyk traveled to Afghanistan to try to discover the motives behind a kidnapping that had occurred six years earlier--his own. Van Dyk's journey revealed evidence of lucrative transactions and rival bandit groups working under the direction of intelligence services. In its course, he met the families of many Americans who were or are still kidnapped, bargaining chips at the mercy of violent and pitiless extremists who thrive in the world's most lawless spaces.

Livestock

 

LIVESTOCK: FOOD, FIBER, AND FRIENDS
By Erin McKenna, Professor of Philosophy

Most livestock in America currently live in cramped and unhealthy confinement, have few stable social relationships with humans or others of their species, and finish their lives by being transported and killed under stressful conditions. In Livestock, McKenna interweaves stories from visits to farms, interviews with producers and activists, and other rich material about the current condition of livestock. In addition, she mixes her account with pragmatist and ecofeminist theorizing about animals and provides substantial historical background about individual species and about human-animal relations.

Seeing Species


 

 

SEEING SPECIES: RE-PRESENTATIONS OF ANIMALS IN MEDIA & POPULAR CULTURE 
By Debra Merskin, Professor of Media Studies

Seeing Species examines the use of animals in media, tracking species from appearances in rock art and picture books to contemporary portrayals in television programs and movies. This book brings together sociological, psychological, historical, cultural, and environmental ways of thinking about nonhuman animals and our relationships with them.

Pocket Field Guide: Oregon Jellies

POCKET FIELD GUIDE: OREGON JELLIES
By Kelly Sutherland, Samantha Zeman, Richard Brodeur, Clare Hansen (Oregon Sea Grant, 2018)

Have you ever seen jellyfish while walking the beach? This guide was created to help beachgoers identify some of the common jellyfish they might encounter while beachcombing or out on the ocean. With this guide, readers can appreciate the diversity of gelatinous animals on the Oregon coast and gain some insight into their natural history.

Spring 2018

Red Diaper Daughter

 

RED DIAPER DAUGHTER: THREE GENERATIONS OF REBELS AND REVOLUTIONARIES
By Laura Bock, BA ’67 (English)

Bock grew up in the late 1940s and ’50s, the daughter of socialists in the labor movement and the granddaughter of Russian-Jewish social revolutionaries. She tells stories of her family legacy, the impact of McCarthyism on her childhood, coming of age in the civil rights and antiwar movements of the 1960s, and finding her voice in the second wave of the women’s liberation movement of the mid-1970s.

In the Shadows

 

IN THE SHADOW OF WORLD LITERATURE: SITES OF READING IN COLONIAL EGYPT
By Michael Allan, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature

Allan, winner of the Modern Languages Association Prize for a First Book, in Sites of Reading in Colonial Egypt makes a momentous intervention into discussions about the global status of literary culture by way of modern Arabic writing, and poses big questions about the nature and operation of literature. He asks how certain forms of writing come to be designated as world literature.

Now I Can See the Moon


 

 

NOW I CAN SEE THE MOON: A STORY OF A SOCIAL PANIC, FALSE MEMORIES, AND A LIFE CUT SHORT
By Alice Tallmadge, MA ’87 (journalism)

In the 1980s and ’90s, a social panic over child sex abuse swept through the country, landing innocent childcare workers in prison and leading hundreds of women to begin recalling episodes of satanic ritual abuse and childhood abuse by family members. In trying to understand the suicide of her 23-year-old niece, a victim of the panic, Tallmadge discovers that what she thought was an isolated tragedy was, in fact, part of a much larger social phenomenon.

Roadside Geology

 

ROADSIDE GEOLOGY OF OREGON
By Marli Miller, Senior Instructor of Earth Sciences

When the first edition of Roadside Geology of Oregon was published in 1978, the implications of plate tectonic theory were only beginning to shape geologic research and discussion. Miller has written a second edition based on an up-to-date understanding of Oregon’s geology. Photographs showcase the state’s splendor while helping readers understand geologic processes at work.

Winter 2018

Trump in the White House
 

 

TRUMP IN THE WHITE HOUSE: TRAGEDY AND FARCE
By John Bellamy Foster, Professor of Sociology

Foster does what no other Trump analyst has done before: he places the president and his administration in full historical context. Foster reveals that Trump is merely the endpoint of a stagnating economic system whose liberal democratic sheen has begun to wear thin. Change can’t happen without radical, antifascist politics, and inside Foster’s analysis is a call to fight back, demonstrating it may be possible to end endless war and create global solidarity with oppressed people.

Turned Inside Out

 

TURNED INSIDE OUT: READING THE RUSSIAN NOVEL IN PRISON
By Steven Shankman, Professor of English

Shankman goes behind prison walls to teach students and inmates texts by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Vasily Grossman, and Emmanuel Levinas. These persecuted writers—Shankman argues that Dostoevsky’s and Levinas’ experiences of incarceration were formative—describe ethical obligation as an experience of being turned inside out by the face-to-face encounter.

Crown Jewel Wilderness

 

CROWN JEWEL WILDERNESS: CREATING NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK
By Lauren Danner, PhD ’99 (communication and society)

In the first comprehensive account of the creation of North Cascades National Park, Danner weaves a narrative that involves more than a decade of grassroots activism and political maneuvering. An unprecedented turn of events left the National Park Service and US Forest Service, agencies that often had adversarial viewpoints and objectives, working side by side.

Hometown Religion

 

HOMETOWN RELIGION: REGIMES OF COEXISTENCE IN EARLY MODERN WESTPHALIA
By David M. Luebke, Professor of History

The pluralization of Christianity dominated cultural life in 16th-century Europe, but in the prince-bishopric of Münster no one form of Christianity prevailed. Hometown Religion was named 2017’s “best book published in English in the field of German Reformation history,” and received an honorable mention for another prize, from the main organization for Reformation-era scholars.