UO Patos/Ducks help create the vibrant and enriching community that makes up the UO.

UO Patos bring traditions, beliefs, knowledge, pride, vision and viewpoints from the diverse cultures that make up the Latinx community.

UO Patos or their ancestors hail from Mexico, Spain, or countries in the Caribbean or Central and South America. They come to the UO from all over Oregon, all over the U.S. and all over the world.

UO Patos help create the fullness that is the UO today, bring forward our rich collective histories and move us towards a future filled with new creative and inspiring possibilities.

STUDENT STORIES

Tre’von Robinson

Chloe Borchard

Noe Sanchez

Cynthia Aguilar-Arizmendi

Naily Nevarez

Yomaira Tarula

Luis Sevilla

Sergio Sanchez

 

LATINX AT THE UO BY THE NUMBERS

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

12%
We have more than tripled the number of Latinx undergraduate students in the last 20 years

GRADUATE STUDENTS

7.6%
We have more than doubled the number of Latinx graduate students in the last 20 years

FACULTY AND EMPLOYEES

5.5%
We have ALMOST DOUBLED the number of Latinx faculty and employees in the last 20 years
 
 

Latinx students take strong leadership roles all throughout campus! In 2018, Maria Gallegos-Chacon was elected the 2018–19 President of the ASUO. Gallegos-Chacon is an ethnic studies major and the daughter of Ecuadorian immigrants.

Through and with her leadership, the ASUO initiates campaigns to improve student experiences, impacting a UO student body of more than 20,000 students.


“I felt isolated at first [when I came to the UO] and then got involved at the Multicultural Center doing community organizing that lead to running for ASUO.

“At some point we either get involved to change it [students from marginalized communities not being at the table] or we just stay on the outside and continue to be mad about it…I often spend most of my days with admin talking with them about issues on campus and bringing up issues about how their potential policies would impact students of color.”

Maria A Gallegos-Chacon
Senior, Ethnic Studies Major
Hillsboro, Oregon


 
 

Latinx students take strong leadership roles all throughout campus! In 2018, Maria Gallegos-Chacon was elected the 2018–19 President of the ASUO. Gallegos-Chacon is an ethnic studies major and the daughter of Ecuadorian immigrants.

Through and with her leadership, the ASUO initiates campaigns to improve student experiences, impacting a UO student body of more than 20,000 students.


“I felt isolated at first [when I came to the UO] and then got involved at the Multicultural Center doing community organizing that lead to running for ASUO.

“At some point we either get involved to change it [students from marginalized communities not being at the table] or we just stay on the outside and continue to be mad about it…I often spend most of my days with admin talking with them about issues on campus and bringing up issues about how their potential policies would impact students of color.”

Maria A Gallegos-Chacon
Senior, Ethnic Studies Major
Hillsboro, Oregon


 
 

Being a first gen student is very difficult in the sense that you don’t have that initial support from your parents that most students do and specifically when [their parents] don’t speak English ... it’s very difficult to navigate college, even community college, navigating that arena ... so being a first gen student has allowed me to have more empathy for students coming up behind me ...that allowed me to want to go out and reach more students who have a similar background to myself and wanting to make sure they have someone, not necessarily a parent, but someone who has gone through that themselves and can lend a helping hand ...

Alvy Macias-Gonzalez
SOCIOLOGY Major
monterey, california


 
 

Being a first gen student is very difficult in the sense that you don’t have that initial support from your parents that most students do and specifically when [their parents] don’t speak English ... it’s very difficult to navigate college, even community college, navigating that arena ... so being a first gen student has allowed me to have more empathy for students coming up behind me ...that allowed me to want to go out and reach more students who have a similar background to myself and wanting to make sure they have someone, not necessarily a parent, but someone who has gone through that themselves and can lend a helping hand ...

Alvy Macias-Gonzalez
SOCIOLOGY Major
monterey, california


WORKING ON CAMPUS
AND IN THE COMMUNITY

REMEMBERING OUR PAST,
MOVING TO OUR FUTURE

 

DREAMERS AT THE UO

The university is committed to promoting the safety, well-being, and success of Dreamers while maintaining their confidentiality and identity. We use the term “Dreamers” to refer to those who are undocumented, participate in DACA, receive tuition equity, or from families with mixed immigration status.

Student immigration status greatly impacts the Latinx community, as well as other communities, most notably many Asian and Middle Eastern communities. We have almost 200 Dreamer allies who have participated in a day-long training to better understand Dreamer student needs and experiences.

UO Dreamers